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New in innovation and entrepreneurship? Top 5 books to start

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Nowadays, many young innovators and startups are trying to turn their ideas into products to grow their business from the needs of customers. The mission is not easy because the definition of innovation may vary from one to another. So, the idea that solve the issue or challenge can be an innovative solution or an invention or just a simple process. Let’s start from the concept, what’s innovation? Many academics and mangers who worked in this filed published several papers and books to identify and define the term based in research and surveys. In this blog post, I will highlight 5 books that can be a good start for you to begin your business:

Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A Competency Framework

This book presents a new model, the competency framework, for students, innovators, entrepreneurs, managers, and anyone who wants to better understand the dynamic world of innovation and entrepreneurship.

Focused on both the individual and strategic organizational level, this book is about people and the competencies each person needs to learn to be successful in creating a more dynamic future. Matthews and Brueggemann’s framework for innovation and entrepreneurship competencies empowers individuals to excel at innovation and new venture creation.

It provides a practical guide and clear and concise understanding of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and experiences that are needed to increase imagination, creativity, innovation and new venture creation capability. Innovation and Entrepreneurship will be attractive for students of entrepreneurship, innovation, management and cross-disciplinary classes, such as design thinking.

How Innovation Works: And Why It Flourishes in Freedom

Matt Ridley argues in this book that we need to change the way we think about innovation, to see it as an incremental, bottom-up, fortuitous process that happens to society as a direct result of the human habit of exchange, rather than an orderly, top-down process developing according to a plan. Innovation is crucially different from invention, because it is the turning of inventions into things of practical and affordable use to people. It speeds up in some sectors and slows down in others. It is always a collective, collaborative phenomenon, not a matter of lonely genius. It is gradual, serendipitous, recombinant, inexorable, contagious, experimental and unpredictable. It happens mainly in just a few parts of the world at any one time. It still cannot be modelled properly by economists, but it can easily be discouraged by politicians. Far from there being too much innovation, we may be on the brink of an innovation famine.

Corporate Innovation in the Fifth Era: Lessons from Alphabet/Google, Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Microsoft

Over the last 30 years a host of new technologies have begun to change every industry driving us into a new era of human existence. The companies who have been most able to tap into these new innovations have become the most highly valued companies in the world. To do so, they have created a new approach to corporate innovation. In “Corporate Innovation in the Fifth Era,” Silicon Valley insiders Matthew C. Le Merle and Alison Davis share the lessons they have learned from two decades of interaction with Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft as well as other leading companies. The authors describe this new approach so that every company can be ready as we enter the Fifth Era.

Innovation Lab Excellence: Digital Transformation from Within

This book goes behind the scenes of working innovation labs to distill a rigorous set of best practices. Apply these to unleash the innovation that will give your enterprise a digital competitive advantage. A full review is available here.

Innovation Ecosystems: Increasing Competitiveness

Martin Fransman presents a new approach to understanding how innovation happens, who makes it happen, and the helps and hindrances. Looking at innovation in real-time under uncertainty, he develops the idea of an ‘innovation ecosystem’, i.e. a system of interrelated players and processes that jointly make innovation happen. Examples include: how companies like Amazon, Google, Facebook, Apple, AT&T, and Huawei interact in the ICT Ecosystem; four innovations that changed the world – the transistor, microprocessor, optical fibre, and the laser; the causes of the telecoms boom and bust of the early 1990s that influenced the Great Recession from 2007; and the usefulness of the idea of innovation ecosystems for Chinese policy makers. By delving into the complex determinants of innovation this book provides a deeper, more rigorous understanding of how it happens. It will appeal to economists, social scientists, business people, policy makers, and anyone interested in innovation and entrepreneurship.

(source: amazon)

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